Creating Interactive Math Textbooks

interactive

“It is not the reader of a text who learns the most,” says Stephen Knudsen, “but rather the author.  When a student makes a textbook in a course, the student engages daily in all classifications of learning…when students are asked to make a textbook, they are required to remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate and create. The results of this process are often nothing short of astonishing!”
Combine popular math tools like OneNote and GeoGebra to create astonishing, interactive math textbooks. Let’s find out how below.

Creating a Digital Textbook

Microsoft OneNote makes digital textbook creation easy. Students can work together on a single OneNote notebook that is organized into “notebook, section groups, sections, and pages.” Create a OneNote notebook as a textbook template, then share it via Docs.com. Students can grab the OneNote notebook digital textbook template, then enhance it. Each student or group of students can take responsibility for a specific section. OneNote enables you to insert all sorts of content, such as Vimeo, YouTube, Office Mix, Sway, and Microsoft Forms.

Organizing a Digital Textbook

Want to create a digital textbook template for your students? Let’s adapt Stephen Knudsen’s suggestions for a digital textbook:
  • Section 1: Welcome
    • Title page featuring student-created cover art
    • Dedication
    • A short Foreword by the teacher or someone who has read the textbook
    • Table of Contents. You can use Onetastic add-on to OneNote to auto-generate a table of contents for each “section chapter” and the digital textbook as a whole.
    • Author’s page with pictures of students, including their Twitter addresses
  • Section 2: Chapter 1 – Introduction
    • Organize the OneNote notebook into sections. Each section is a chapter.
    • Each section chapter will include its own table of contents and introduction.
  • Section 3: Chapter 2
  • Section 4: Chapter 3
  • Section 5: Chapter 4
  • Section 6: Chapter 5 – Conclusion
  • Section 7: Chapter 6 – Appendix
Students create hand-drawn resources and then digitize their creations with the mobile-friendly Office Lens app. Tablet access? Students can create their first draft of figures within OneNote. Identify key terms, record video/audio definitions and explanation. Design tall buildings and describe in a video how they were created. For math problems, students can use OneNote digital whiteboard technology to draft their explanation. Or rely on Microsoft Snip’s whiteboard capabilities and then embed that in the OneNote page. A few other tips include adding tags to chapters, creating a hyperlinked table of contents for each section, and setting a page template specific to each section. When complete, future classes can access the digital textbook via OneNote Online or a “frozen” copy can be permanently published at Docs.com.

Exploring GeoGebrainteractive

Wondering how to add difficult mathematics constructs? Take advantage of GeoGebra tools and materials.
GeoGebra is dynamic mathematics software for all levels of education (free to non-commercial users) that joins geometry, algebra, spreadsheets, graphing, statistics, and calculus. It also runs offline and works on various software platforms and devices (Source).
GeoGebra enjoys a rich community of support (check out Kurt Soeser, fellow Microsoft Innovative Educator (MIE), work | watch his video) with over 500,000 pre-created resources. In addition to creating content with GeoGebra, students can also place any of those half a million resources within their digital textbook. Want to see this in action? Go to my TCEA Connect OneNote notebook using this link. You can also watch the YouTube video walkthrough.

Conclusion

Rather than rely on traditional textbook publishers, adopt a maker attitude in your math classroom. Empower students to create digital textbooks using Microsoft OneNote and GeoGebra. Publish to a worldwide audience and ensure that the learning is meaningful and authentic.

Image Source

“Embed GeoGebra in OneNote” via Kurt Soeser as featured in the LearnOneNote Conference. Available at https://www.learnonconference.com/kurt-soeser-2016 during 11/12-11/17, 2016.

Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

OneNote as a Blogging Platform

“I am interested in the Integration Blog project,” says Jennifer Moore, “but I am wondering if I can do a OneNote instead?” Jennifer participates in the TCEA Campus Technology Specialist Certification program, a phenomenal learning opportunity for TCEA members. In this blog entry, we explore a few detours to a Microsoft OneNote-based blog. For a blog to be read, it must be relevant to its readers. Yet reader-relevant blog entries cannot be the sole measure of a successful blog.

Note: This blog entry was originally published at TCEA.org Technotes Blog! TCEA.org is a non-profit education organization. Check it out at http://www.tcea.org/blog. In the interests of full disclosure, Miguel Guhlin serves as a Director of Professional Development; find out more about his work at http://ly.tcea.org/connect

The Measure of a Blog

The rubric for an Integration Blog Project includes the following elements:
  • Blog Layout and Theme
  • Blog Entries (minimum of five)
  • Spelling and Grammar
You could use a traditional blog platform (e.g. Blogger, Tumbler, WordPress, old Google Sites’ Announcement feature, etc.) and miss a Microsoft option, OneNote. Three elements characterize blogs: 1) Content readers can subscribe to the blog via real simple syndication (RSS); 2) Entries are organized in reverse chronological order; and 3) The blog offers reflection on an experience, research, or current topic.  As John Dewey points out, “We do not learn from experience…we learn from reflecting on experience.”

Creating Enduring Content

“Either write something worth reading,” quipped Benjamin Franklin, “or do something worth writing.” The best blog entries combine both in a simple formula:
  1. Introductions: A fresh take on an instructional strategy or technology that excites.
  2. Compelling Narrative, simply organized: Ready to jump into your blog entry? Start with these three steps:
  • Define a problem that held you back.
  • Tell about the hero’s journey you made to find a solution, including audio/video interviews and/or demos.
  • Move forward, step by step, to a successful resolution. Use the list approach (e.g. listicle) and keep it simple.
  1. The Call for Adoption: In short, punchy sentences, call for adoption of the new strategy. This can also be a call to action. Write fast, write short.
Mix the steps and use a quote or problem scenario to set the hook.

Detours Around OneNote Obstacles

“I want to use OneNote as a blog,” some have said, “but OneNote doesn’t quite work as a blog.” To use it as such, you have to overcome a few obstacles:
  • Real Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds are not available for OneNote Online Notebooks.
  • Reverse Chronological order of blog entries isn’t publish and forget it.
Eager to adapt OneNote for a blog solution, I sought out various solutions. Most failed, but these were workable. Let’s explore the detours.

Detour #1: RSS Feed

detoursCreate an RSS feed for OneNote blog entries with the Diigo Social Bookmarking Tool. Every web page you bookmark and tag gets added to an RSS feed for the tag. Below, you can see items tagged “mgc” via Diigo bookmarks. These tagged items reflect favorites from my OneNote Online notebook, TCEA Connects!
Scroll to the bottom of the page shown above to see the distinctive RSS feed icon:
detours
Get the RSS link, then add an RSS icon of your own to the front page of your OneNote Online notebook (example shown below). Subscribers click on the RSS icon to subscribe with their RSS Aggregator of choice (e.g. Feedly.com):
detours
Now that you have an RSS feed via Diigo tagged items, copy and paste the link to a specific OneNote Online page:
detours
With the “Copy Link to this Page” in your device’s clipboard you can paste the link into Diigo to add it to the RSS feed:
detours
Update 12/1/2016: Another way to obtain a link, especially if you are using the free Windows 10 OneNote app (as opposed to OneNote 2016), is to do what Marjolein Hoekstra (Twitter: @onenotec) suggests in this 11/30/16 blog entry:
“Share a view-only link to an individual page through Share > Get a Link. Unique for OneNote for Windows 10 and only for notebooks stored on consumer OneDrive. Recipients can open this page in a browser.” See Marjolein’s example, Emoji Keyboard sample page, below:
detours
Once added, view the RSS feed (only if you must) and see the result (highlighted section is what we just added):
detours

Sharing the RSS Feed via Twitter/Facebook

The next step is to use IFTTT.com to publish your RSS feed content to Twitter/Facebook. Anything added to the RSS feed will be shared via detoursTwitter or Facebook. Check out this how-to available online.

Detour #2 – Reverse Chronological Order

Re-organize your pages in OneNote to get a reverse chronological list of blog entries. Simply click and drag the title of the blog entry to where it should go.
detours

Give It a Try!

OneNote 2016, 100% free, features a full-blown editing toolbar, automatically timestamps your blog entries, makes it easy to embed content (without messy embed code) from various sources (a feature other blog platforms make difficult or for pay), and image embedding is drop-dead simple. This makes it the perfect blog tool, especially when you incorporate Diigo RSS feeds and take care to organize pages in your OneNote blog. You can also publish a notebook via Docs.com as an ebook, viewable across numerous mobile devices. And you can password protect sections to prevent unauthorized access to blog entries (e.g. for pay, embargoed or not ready for release). Wow, give it a try!

Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

Creating Interactive Math Textbooks

interactive

We learn best and deepest when we create. Take this approach to a new level in math classes by having students create their own interactive textbooks.
“It is not the reader of a text who learns the most,” says Stephen Knudsen, “but rather the author.  When a student makes a textbook in a course, the student engages daily in all classifications of learning…when students are asked to make a textbook, they are required to remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate and create. The results of this process are often nothing short of astonishing!”
Combine popular math tools like OneNote and GeoGebra to create astonishing, interactive math textbooks. Let’s find out how below.

Note: This blog entry was originally published at TCEA.org Technotes Blog! TCEA.org is a non-profit education organization. Check it out at http://www.tcea.org/blog. In the interests of full disclosure, Miguel Guhlin serves as a Director of Professional Development; find out more about his work at http://ly.tcea.org/connect

Creating a Digital Textbook

Microsoft OneNote makes digital textbook creation easy. Students can work together on a single OneNote notebook that is organized into “notebook, section groups, sections, and pages.” Create a OneNote notebook as a textbook template, then share it via Docs.com. Students can grab the OneNote notebook digital textbook template, then enhance it. Each student or group of students can take responsibility for a specific section. OneNote enables you to insert all sorts of content, such as Vimeo, YouTube, Office Mix, Sway, and Microsoft Forms.

Organizing a Digital Textbook

Want to create a digital textbook template for your students? Let’s adapt Stephen Knudsen’s suggestions for a digital textbook:
  • Section 1: Welcome
    • Title page featuring student-created cover art
    • Dedication
    • A short Foreword by the teacher or someone who has read the textbook
    • Table of Contents. You can use Onetastic add-on to OneNote to auto-generate a table of contents for each “section chapter” and the digital textbook as a whole.
    • Author’s page with pictures of students, including their Twitter addresses
  • Section 2: Chapter 1 – Introduction
    • Organize the OneNote notebook into sections. Each section is a chapter.
    • Each section chapter will include its own table of contents and introduction.
  • Section 3: Chapter 2
  • Section 4: Chapter 3
  • Section 5: Chapter 4
  • Section 6: Chapter 5 – Conclusion
  • Section 7: Chapter 6 – Appendix
Students create hand-drawn resources and then digitize their creations with the mobile-friendly Office Lens app. Tablet access? Students can create their first draft of figures within OneNote. Identify key terms, record video/audio definitions and explanation. Design tall buildings and describe in a video how they were created. For math problems, students can use OneNote digital whiteboard technology to draft their explanation. Or rely on Microsoft Snip’s whiteboard capabilities and then embed that in the OneNote page. A few other tips include adding tags to chapters, creating a hyperlinked table of contents for each section, and setting a page template specific to each section. When complete, future classes can access the digital textbook via OneNote Online or a “frozen” copy can be permanently published at Docs.com.

Exploring GeoGebrainteractive

Wondering how to add difficult mathematics constructs? Take advantage of GeoGebra tools and materials.
GeoGebra is dynamic mathematics software for all levels of education (free to non-commercial users) that joins geometry, algebra, spreadsheets, graphing, statistics, and calculus. It also runs offline and works on various software platforms and devices (Source).
GeoGebra enjoys a rich community of support (check out Kurt Soeser, fellow Microsoft Innovative Educator (MIE), work | watch his video) with over 500,000 pre-created resources. In addition to creating content with GeoGebra, students can also place any of those half a million resources within their digital textbook. Want to see this in action? Go to my TCEA Connect OneNote notebook using this link. You can also watch the YouTube video walkthrough.

Conclusion

Rather than rely on traditional textbook publishers, adopt a maker attitude in your math classroom. Empower students to create digital textbooks using Microsoft OneNote and GeoGebra. Publish to a worldwide audience and ensure that the learning is meaningful and authentic.

Featured Image Source

“Embed GeoGebra in OneNote” via Kurt Soeser as featured in the LearnOneNote Conference. Available at https://www.learnonconference.com/kurt-soeser-2016 during 11/12-11/17, 2016.

Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

Encrypting #OneNote Pages and Sections #free #onlineconference

Looking for an easy way to encrypt and protect data stored in OneNote? Fortunately, OneNote provides encryption when you password protect a section:

Source:

Passwords can be applied only to notebook sections, not to entire notebooks. Passwords are case-sensitive. Make sure that the Caps Lock key is off before you create or enter a password. OneNote uses encryption to secure password-protected sections. (Source)

OneNote’s Password protected section offers a few benefits:

  • AES 128 bit encryption protects any pages you’ve created inside of the passworded section.
  • Microsoft is reported to use the local cryptography built-into Windows operating system.
  • Passworded sections placed on the web (shared online via OneNote Online) require the end-user to enter a password to get access.
  • OneNote uses encryption to secure password-protected sections. If you forget your password, no one will be able to unlock your notes for you (not even Microsoft Technical Support). So take care when assigning passwords to your notebook sections and when changing them.
Here’s what OneNote looks like when you’re Password Protecting a section:
Note that you can modify the Password Options in OneNote settings:
But AES 128 encryption may not be enough.
More Encryption Needed?
Of course, as nice as AES 128bit may be, it doesn’t meet the standard for super confidential information (e.g. everything that is personal identifiable information or health info). If you forget your password to a passworded section in OneNote, it would be difficult, if not impossible, to get access to it again. I don’t know if DocRecryptor exists for OneNote, but I know I wouldn’t want to trust it with data that must be confidential. For that reason, among others, it is important to take a hard look at other encryption options that go above and beyond OneNote’s built-in passworded section. 
Source

Here are some additional solutions I would encourage you to add if you’re going to use any Microsoft product:

  • Encrypt your Onenote page content with Secure Space Encryptor (SSE)
    • Encrypt files with the File/Folder Encryption Tool
    • Encrypt text with the Text Encryptor
  • Use Keepass for Windows, Mac, or GNU/Linux to store confidential information. The database file itself is encrypted with AES-256 so you can add it as a file attachment.
If you want to keep the source formatting for a document (e.g. font choices, colors, headings, etc.) then you will probably be better off exporting data as a Word document, encrypting it with SSE, then adding it as a file attachment.
While encryption can be an obstacle for some, it is important to find a way to secure your data, no matter what notes tool you decide to use. You can find my resources for Safeguarding Sensitive Data online.

    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

    OneNote Case #2: Accounts and More #msftedu @microsoft_edu #mieexpert

    Question: Hi all, I’m trying to get our teachers to share LPs with admin using OneNote, but I’m having such a hard time because its asking teachers for a sign in AND it won’t take our work emails…any ideas as to what I’m doing wrong?

    A common problem for most folks new to Microsoft and Office 365 is trying to understand when to use their Office 365 account (work email account) vs their personal, Microsoft account. Here’s my 18min video on using Onenote for lesson plans.  I address Microsoft vs Office365 login issues, as well as some ideas. If viewers have other suggestions, make a video and share it! I’d love to feature it! https://youtu.be/O7KEhfhQQSw

    Really, it’s a terrible video. What would you have said?
    🙂


    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

    OneNote Case #1: Opening Notebooks #msftedu @microsoft_edu @office365

    Question: Office 365/OneNote question: Some of our teachers click on the OneNote app within O365 but instead of taking them to a list of all their notebooks, it automatically opens up their @sites notebook. The only way for them to access a different notebook is by clicking on a direct link someone has shared with them. Has anyone else experienced this? Or now a fix?

    Over the last few months, I feel quite comfortable working with OneNote. Just today, I moved my Sharepoint OneNote notebooks to a Microsoft based OneDrive. The reason why is the subject of another blog entry, but when I read the question above, I thought I would suggest the following approach that has worked for me. What would have been your response?

    Are you trying to open a OneNote Notebook in OneNote 2016, and it’s not working? Try this approach:


    1) Close out all Notebooks in OneNote 2016.
    2) Remove all accounts in OneNote 2016
    3) Add the account you use to login to OneDrive online.
    4) Go to your internet browser, then go to OneDrive for Business (Sharepoint).
    5) Open the OneNote Notebook stored at OneDrive for Business in OneNote Online.
    6) Click on OPEN IN ONENOTE and then choose OneNote 2016. 
    7) Give the notebook time to sync to your computer.
    8) When done synching, the Notebook should be ready to go.



    That approach aside, working with OneNote 2016 is a pure joy. I enjoy working with OneNote and I’m migrating much of my work from a Google Sites (old version) to a OneNote Online notebook (http://tinyurl.com/mgconnect). Find out more about my efforts online.


    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

    OneNote Best Use Scenarios: Video+Questions

    When you connect to a global network of learners, you have to expect gems to pop up from moment to moment. In fact, I took a quick glance at my phone earlier today and saw the following from fellow educator, Steve Morgan.


    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure