action steps are changes, Every change is 10 second change; see in 10 seconds within walking into classroom- make bite size pieces

will use Teach like a Champion book for Instrl and mgmt strategies to help with action steps

in our end of year review we discovered that not all action steps were as clear and precise as should be;
if you follow the plan, stay scheduled with all observations focused on improving student instruction, it works !
has been a great year, staff was very receptive; great feedback for admin at EOY conferences; brought program to us

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Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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MyNotes – Leverage Leadership – Chapter 1

Get book – Barnes and Noble | Amazon | 

With a few colleagues, we’ve started reading Leverage Leadership. Here’s a little about the book:

Paul Bambrick-Santoyo (Managing Director of Uncommon Schools) shows leaders how they can raise their schools to greatness by following a core set of principles. These seven principles, or “levers,” allow for consistent, transformational, and replicable growth. With intentional focus on these areas, leaders will leverage much more learning from the same amount of time investment. Fundamentally, each of these seven levers answers the core questions of school leadership: What should an effective leader do, and how and when should they do it.

I like the fact that it starts out with formulas and recipes for success. You know, “Do this and you’ll get these results.” Who wouldn’t like to be told what to do, and then what results to search for? I hope you’ll join me as I take notes on this book.

My Notes

Chapter 1 – Data-driven Instruction (DDI)

  1. DDI begins with and is sustained by meetings at which principals or other designated instructional leaders create the highest-leverage, most game-changing 30-minute conversations possible–conversations that lead to results.
  2. It’s not about “Did we teach it?” but “Did students learn it? And, if they didn’t, how can we teach it so that they do?”
  3. DDI depends on 4 keys:
    1. Assessment – roadmap for rigor.
    2. Analysis – determine where students are struggling and why
    3. Action – implement new teaching plans to respond to this analysis
    4. Systems – create systems and procedures to ensure continual data-driven improvement
  4. Standards are meaningless until you define how to assess them.
  5. Teaching to simple standards leave students unprepared for higher-level questions/standards.
  6. College-ready assessments are the guide toward rigor.
  7. If assessments define rigor, then they must be common across all classes and grade levels…otherwise, equal rigor cannot be guaranteed in each classroom.
  8. “Measuring outcomes is only useful if you know what the target should be. If the target is different in each classroom, then we have no way to know how students are doing across the cohort relatively to each other. The students are stuck with varying degrees of rigor depending on which teacher they have. That’s not fair to our students.”
  9. Levels of alignment:
    1. State test-aligned
    2. College ready-aligned
    3. Curriculum sequence-aligned
  10. Change your curriculum sequence to match that of the interim assessment or change interim assessment to test standards in the same chronological order as you curriculum.
  11. DDI isn’t about teaching to the test, but rather, testing the teaching.
  12. Weekly observations of all teachers allow a window for viewing 1 percent of instruction, while data analysis meetings allow 80% of student learning to be assessed.
  13. Great data analysis starts from clear and intuitive data reports:
    1. One page summaries, in table form, of each student’s performance on the assessment and show class performance at 4 levels:
      1. Question level – how students performed on each question and what wrong answer choices they made.
      2. Skill or standard level – how they performed on each standard
      3. Student level – how well each individual student performed
      4. Global/whole class level – how well the class performed.
  14. Assessment reports should be prepared within 48 hours of the assessment’s distribution.
  15. Leaders must model how to analyze data.
  16. Going Deep: Effective Analysis
    1. Make a solid hypothesis based on questions
    2. Test your hypothesis
    3. Make explicit action steps
    4. Repeat the process for struggling and special education students
  17. Highly effective leaders guide from the back pocket…keep your answers in your back pocket and lead by asking questions so they can independently reach and embrace the solution.
  18. Even for school leaders who have learned to analyze data closely, guiding teachers to do the same can be quite difficult. Try this:
    1. Analyze teacher’s results before the meeting.
    2. When needed, get help with content expertise.
    3. Assessment is useless until it affects instruction…set clear dates to ensure this happens.
  19. Steps:
    1. Make assessment an ongoing process.
    2. Use schoolwide systems to support change.
    3. Make accountability easy.
  20. Fundamentals of data-driven instruction:
    1. Interim assessments
    2. Analysis Meetings 
    3. Time to implement action steps
  21. In regards to school calendars, put the assessment cycle in first and learning will take priority.
  22. Implementation rubric includes these components:
    1. Data-Driven Culture
      1. Highly active leadership team
      2. Introductory professional development
      3. Implementation calendar
      4. Ongoing professional development
      5. Build by borrowing
    2. Assessments
      1. Common interim assessment 4-6 times per year
      2. Transparent starting point
      3. Aligned to state tests and college readiness
      4. Aligned to instructional sequence of clearly defined grade level/content expectations
      5. Reassess previously taught standards
    3. Analysis
      1. Immediate turnaround of assessment results within 48 hours
      2. User-friendly, succinct data reports (item-level analysis, standards-level analysis, bottom line results)
      3. Teacher-owned analysis
      4. Test-in-hand analysis
      5. Deep (answers about why student got it wrong)
    4. Action
      1. Plan new lessons colalboratively
      2. Implement explicit teacher action plans
      3. Ongoing assessment
      4. Accountability
      5. Engaged students know the end goal, how they did, and what actions they are taking to improve.
  23. Until you achieve proficiency with the data-driven instruction lever, none of the other instructional levers will work effectively. 

My Questions

  1. Will interim assessments need to be developed?
  2. If every teacher teaches any lesson they deem appropriate, and each campus has autonomy, how will we have consistent outcomes?
  3. If currently students have inconsistent outcomes, then can we really compare students from one campus to another?
  4. DDI presupposes a consistent curriculum that all teachers follow. Is this a pre-requisite that prevents going forward? In other words, will we need to develop a curriculum guide–sequenced appropriately–before we can move forward?

My Reflections
I appreciate the forum for discussing questions about the “Leverage Leadership” text. Two key points jumped out at me because they appear to be pre-requisites to moving forward. Please be aware that you may be aware of details that make my contribution inaccurate (e.g. CSCOPE provides end-goal assessments that could be used, so it may be inaccurate to say end-goal assessments don’t appear to exist classroom to classroom).

Key Point #1 –  If assessments define rigor, then they must be common across all classes and grade levels…otherwise, equal rigor cannot be guaranteed in each classroom. “Measuring outcomes is only useful if you know what the target should be. If the target is different in each classroom, then we have no way to know how students are doing across the cohort relatively to each other. The students are stuck with varying degrees of rigor depending on which teacher they have. That’s not fair to our students.”

The questions that come to mind include the following:

1) Will interim assessments need to be developed district-wide? Since I imagine the answer is YES, how will these interim assessment be deployed? Developing interim assessments can be a tough task and having seen large districts struggle with developing valid, reliable interim assessments, it seems worthwhile to invest in a “bank” of assessments rather than try to develop in-house. Whether that’s a point of agreement or not, another issue is how to administer interim assessments.

School districts can spend a lot of money administering interim assessments, not just funding on creating them. Even if you are paper-n-pencil based, it could cost a lot of money. Since the goal is to move towards paperless, what digital management system for interim assessments would be put in place? Without a digital system, it may be exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, to achieve the 48 hours between administering an assessment and getting the results.

2) If every teacher teaches any lesson they deem appropriate, and each campus has autonomy, how will we have consistent outcomes?
Without a curriculum scope-n-sequence in place, and articulated end-goal assessments, how will consistency be achieved across classrooms, from teacher to teacher, campus to campus?

These are two questions that come to mind.

Key Point #2 – DDI presupposes a consistent curriculum that all teachers follow. Is this a pre-requisite that prevents going forward? In other words, will we need to develop a curriculum guide–sequenced appropriately–before we can move forward?

Since data-driven instruction is the first lever–“Until you achieve proficiency with the data-driven instruction lever, none of the other instructional levers will work effectively.”–does this mean we will need to develop a consistent curriculum scope-n-sequence with end-goal assessments and interim assessments before moving forward with implementation?


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Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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MyNotes – Leverage Leadership: Foreword and Introduction

Get book – Barnes and Noble | Amazon

With a few colleagues, we’ve started reading Leverage Leadership. Here’s a little about the book:

Paul Bambrick-Santoyo (Managing Director of Uncommon Schools) shows leaders how they can raise their schools to greatness by following a core set of principles. These seven principles, or “levers,” allow for consistent, transformational, and replicable growth. With intentional focus on these areas, leaders will leverage much more learning from the same amount of time investment. Fundamentally, each of these seven levers answers the core questions of school leadership: What should an effective leader do, and how and when should they do it.

I like the fact that it starts out with formulas and recipes for success. You know, “Do this and you’ll get these results.” Who wouldn’t like to be told what to do, and then what results to search for? I hope you’ll join me as I take notes on this book.

My Notes

Foreword

  1. A study found that on average principals spent on administrative and organizational tasks…
    1. more than 27% of their time on admin tasks–managing schedules, discipline issues, and compliance.
    2. 20 percent on organizational tasks such as hiring, responding to teacher concerns, checking to see if there was money in the budget for projector bulbs or travel to workshops
    3. less than 6 percent was spent on day to day instruction, including activities such as observing classrooms, coaching teachers to make them better, leading or planning professional development, using data to drive instruction and evaluating teachers.
    4. The most important work in the building went unmanaged 94%of the time in the face of other tasks.
  2. The book addresses how to move from…”I get it” to “I can do it” to I know people in the organization will reliably do it.”

Introduction

  1. What concrete actions does an excellent school leader take at each moment to make his or her school exceptional?
  2. What really makes education effective is well-leveraged leadership that ensures great teaching to guarantee great learning.
  3. Exceptional school leaders are insistent on being instructional leaders, claiming ultimate responsibility for instruction in their building.
  4. Exceptional school leaders are very intentional about how they use observations and walkthroughs, placing the utmost emphasis on the process of giving the right feedback and making sure teachers implement it.
  5. “Our students cannot wait 10 years for a teacher to become effective–that’s their entire educational career.”
  6. A detailed structure for teacher development that focused on the highest-leverage teacher actions and that could be adapter to the varying needs of teachers.
  7. Exceptional leaders have a drive to continuously improve their school and this motivates them far more than the results they achieve.
  8. Both instruction and culture are vital and must be led simultaneously.
  9. Book boasts seven levers to executing quality instruction and culture; they include:
    1. Instructional levers:
      1. Data-driven instruction. Define the roadmap for rigor and adapt teaching to meet students’ needs.
      2. Observation and feedback. Professional, one on one coaching that increases their effectiveness.
      3. Instructional planning. Guaranteee every student well-structured lessons that teach the right content.
      4. Professional development. Strengthen both culture and instruction with hands-on training that sticks.
    2. Cultural levers:
      1. Student culture. Create a strong culture where learning thrives.
      2. Staff culture. Build and support the right team for your school.
      3. Managing school leadership teams. Train instructional leaders to expand your impact across the school.
  10. Global recommendations (great!):
    1. For Principals:
      1. Start with Data-Driven Instruction and Student Culture
      2. Build the Observation and Feedback Cycle
      3. Implement remaining levers as much as is feasible in Year 1
    2. For Coaches and Other instructional Leaders:
      1. Start with Data-Driven instruction and observation and feedback
      2. Build in Planning
      3. Add professional development (focusing on delivering effective professional development sessions)
    3. For Superintendents:
      1. Limited time? Data and Student Culture, then add observation, feedback, and time.

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MyNotes – The New Digital Age – Chapter 3: The Future of States

About This Series – Earlier this week, a copy of Dr. Eric Shmidt’s and Jared Cohen’s book, The New Digital Age: Transforming nations, businesses and our lives arrived on my desk. You can read my notes on this book.


In this blog entry, I explore Chapter 3 – The Future of States, then offer reflections.

Table of Contents


Over the next few days, I’ll be reading the book and sharing my notes on what jumps out at me and my quick reflections.

My Notes

  1. Empowerment for people comes from what they have access to, while states can derive power from their position as gatekeeper (control over physical infrastructure required by connectivity).
  2. The Internet could ultimately be seen as the realization of the classic international-relations theory of an anarchic, leaderless world.
  3. The impulse to project laws from the physical world into the virtual one is a fundamentally naive notion…
  4. The most sophisticated censorship states invest a great deal of resources to build filtering systems, then punish violators.
  5. China, Turkey, Germany are listed as models of Internet censorship–the bad kind of model.
  6. The authors predict that states will attempt to engage in “collective editing” through the use of nationalized Internets.
  7. Internet asylum seeker – a dissident who can’t live freely under an autocratic Internet and is refused access to other states’ internets will choose to seek physical asylum in another country to gain virtual freedom on its Internet.
  8. “National intranet:” Countries might create their own walled gardens for internal content that separates its people from the rest of the world,giving them complete control over the contents and what people can access.
  9. Declaring virtual statehood would become an act of treason…the concept of virtual institutions alone could breathe new life into secessionist groups that have tried and failed to produce concrete outcomes through violent means…one example includes the suggestion that if the Texas secession movement rallied together to launch a virtual Republic of Texas.
  10. In the future, superpowers will look to create their spheres of online influence around specific protocols and products, so that their technologies form the backbone of a particular society and their client states come to rely on certain critical infrastructure that the superpower alone builds, services and controls.
    Response: Reminds me of China and other countries expelling Microsoft Windows and switch to a copy of GNU/Linux that they’ve customized for use in their country.
  11. One neglected or unprotected device on the network can become the attacker’s base and then compromise the whole system.
  12. “What we observed in cybersecurity is that we needed to create the equivalent of an adaptive immune system in computer security architecture.”
  13. States will long for the days when they only had to think about foreign and domestic policies in the physical world.
What a fun chapter to read. Some of the concepts were familiar to me, but if you haven’t read any of this before, then it can be pretty mind-blowing. Virtual and physical warfare, creating national walled gardens, states creating their own infrastructures to control the flow of information and ideas and safeguard your work…wow.

It’s almost like building a digital moat around your country and then populating the water with elements of “adaptive immune system…” like virtual crocodiles, etc.!

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MyNotes – The New Digital Age – Chapter 2: The Future of Identity, Citizenship and Reporting


About This Series
 – Earlier this week, a copy of Dr. Eric Shmidt’s and Jared Cohen’s book, 
The New Digital Age: Transforming nations, businesses and our lives arrived on my desk. You can read my notes on this book.


In this blog entry, I explore the current chapter, then share my reflections.

Table of Contents


Over the next few days, I’ll be reading the book and sharing my notes on what jumps out at me and my quick reflections.

MyNotes: Chapter 2 – The Future of Identity, Citizenship and Reporting

  1. The impact of the data revolution–where massive amounts of data about individuals that is captured via the connections they make online–will strip citizens of much of their control over their personal information in virtual space, and that will have significant consequences in the physical world.
  2. The challenge we face as individuals is determining what steps we are willing to take to regain control over our privacy and security.
  3. In the future, our identities in everyday life will come to be defined more and more by our virtual activities and associations…our ability to influence and control how we are perceived by others will decrease dramatically.
  4. The technology industry is already hard at work to find creative ways to mitigate risks, such as through two-factor authentication…strong encryption will be nearly universally adopted as a better but not perfect solution.
    Response: Actually, two factor authentication is a pain but requires you have a mobile device with you at all times. Nothing so annoying as working at home and having to have my mobile phone–which is usually on a charger downstairs–just so I can access my online data. In regards to encryption, who’s going hold the keys to decrypt the data? I don’t trust Google, or any cloud provider for that matter, to hold the key. If something needs to be protected, then I have to do it. We’re talking, not about top secret defense documents a la NSA, but rather family medical, financial records and personally identifiable information.
  5. The true cost of remaining anonymous, then, might be irrelevance.
    Response: If you don’t want to connect and be known, then you have to unplug. Yuck. This is untenable if you want to work in today’s society. Or, you simply use your employer’s accounts with the understanding your work is public and do your best to keep your “personal” data to yourself. This won’t work over the long run, though. Sooner or later, you’ll be thrown into the pool, doused in, for a lack of a better term, “unprivacy.”
  6. Governments will find it more difficult to maneuver as their citizens become more connected. Destroying documents, kidnapping, demolishing monuments–restrict and repressive actions like these will lose much of their functional and symbolic power in the new digital age.
  7. For children and adolescents, the incentives to share will always outweigh the vague, distant risks of self-exposure, even with salient examples of the consequences in public view.
  8. By the time a man is in his forties (hey, that’s me!), he will have accumulated and stored a comprehensive online narrative, all facts and fictions, every misstep and every triumph, spanning every phase of his life.
  9. “Virtual honor killing” – which is online character assassination.
  10. Most parents will realize that the most valuable way to help their child is to have the privacy-and-security talk even before the sex talk.
    Response: I actually did do this with my two children.
  11. A whole fascinating section on Wikileaks, reporting whistleblower leaks, etc. 
  12. Mainstream media outlets increasingly find themselves a step behind in reporting…these organization simply cannot move quickly enough in a connected age.
  13. One new subcategory to emerge will be a network of local technical encryption specialists, who deal exclusively in encryption keys…their value for journalist would not be content or source related but instead would provide the necessary confidentiality mechanism between parties.
    Response: Fascinating prediction. Security brokers.
  14. Disaggregated, mutually anonymous news-gathering system will be possible…
  15. Cloud computing only reinforces the permanence of information, adding another layer of remote protection for users and their information.
  16. In an open democracy, where free expression and responsive governance feed the public’s impulse to share, citizens will increasingly serve as judge and jury of their peers.
    Response: We already see this now with teachers and others. Post something dumb on twitter and you’re fired before you arrive at your destination (I forget who that happened to).
  17. Virtual juvenile records…this is fascinating. Anything you share before a certain age may become unusable, sealed and not for public disclosure.
  18. “In a world with no delete button, peer-to-peer (P2P) networking will become the default mode of operation for anyone looking to operate under or off the radar.”
This chapter had a lot more info and predictions…to be honest, it can be frightening to consider all the possible changes and the authors did a nice job of extrapolating from existing case studies of how identity, citizenship, the State/government fits in. I’m thoroughly frightened at the ideas of trying to navigate all of this. But then, who wouldn’t be unless you have tons of cash?
I’m honestly reminded of Daniel Suarez’ fictional stories of the future, Daemon and Freedom. If you haven’t read these, you need to simply to better understand what the authors of The New Digital Age are suggesting may be possible. Suarez does a nice job of fictionalizing the new realities…and scaring the heck out of his readers!


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MyNotes – The New Digital Age – Chapter 1: Our Future Selves

About This Series – Earlier this week, a copy of Dr. Eric Shmidt’s and Jared Cohen’s book, The New Digital Age: Transforming nations, businesses and our lives arrived on my desk. You can read my notes on this book.


In this blog entry, I explore the current chapter, then share my reflections.

Table of Contents


Over the next few days, I’ll be reading the book and sharing my notes on what jumps out at me and my quick reflections.

MyNotes: Chapter 1 – Our Future Selves

  1. “People will find that being connected virtually makes us feel more equal–with access to the same basic platforms, information, and online resources–while significant differences persist in the physical world.”
  2. Having access to virtual will make physical interactions more efficient and effective. Authors cite example of Congolese fisherwomen who sell their fish catch online rather than watch it rot at a market. In this way, there is no need for refrigeration, no need for someone to guard the fish, no danger of spoiled fish, no unnecessary overfishing.
  3. People are able to leap frog old technologies (e.g. dial-up modems) and go directly to high-speed wireless connections, which means “the transformations that connectivity brings will occur even more quickly than they did in the developed world.”
  4. “What connectivity also brings is the ability to collect and use data.”
  5. Haircuts will finally be automated and machine-precise.
    Response: This is pretty amazing…I always think that hair-dressing won’t be out-sourced but it’s possible technology might take over this. Scary but possible? Right now, I’m able to schedule my haircut appointments using my mobile phone and avoid wait time (e.g. GreatClips app).
  6. Since integrated systems will take care of stuff that takes time out of our day, “we’ll be able to use our time more effectively each day–whether that means having the time to have a ‘deep think,'” etc.
    Response: When I reflect on how much time I spent looking at web sites and how much time I save now using RSS tools like Zite, Flipboard, Feedly.com, I am grateful that I don’t have to waste time anymore trying to get to the information I need or want. Now, it comes to me.
  7. “Instant language translation, virtual-reality interactions, and real-time collective editing–most easily understood today as wikis–will reshape how firms and organizations interact with partners, clients, and employees in other places…the ability to engage with people in disparate locations, with near-total comprehension and on shared platforms, will make such interactions feel incredibly familiar.”
    Response: I am already experiencing the benefit of being able to interact with folks using wikis, or GoogleDocs/Drive. Google Drive, Hangouts have made these interactions possible and easy.
  8. Mobile Phone Shoe Charger – Twenty-four year old inventory Anthony Mutua (2012 Nairobi science fair) shared an ultrathin crystal chip that can generate electricity when put under pressure. Just by walking, a person can charge his mobile phone.
    Response: Although the authors assert that this is something best used in developing countries, there are some obvious benefits for folks who spend a lot of time on their feet, out and about. Smartphones drain power from their batteries, especially when you’re using them for GPS, etc. I would love to see this kind of technology available now.
  9. “Most students will be highly technologically literate in some cases, as schools continue to integrate technology into lesson plans and, in some cases, replace traditional lessons with more interactive workshops. Education will be a more flexible experience, adapting itself to children’s learning styles and pace instead of the other way around. . .Critical thinking and problem-solving skills will become the focus in many school systems as ubiquitous digital-knowledge tools…reduce the importance of rote memorization.”
    Response: This is certainly the hope but I see this under development organically rather than systemically. That’s a concern, isn’t it?
  10. Digital platforms will eventually be able to withstand any environmental turbulence and continue to serve the needs of users. 
  11. A lot of predictions….
  12. “Each individual, state and organization will have to discover its own formula, and those that can best navigate this multidimensional world will find themselves ahead in the future.”

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Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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MyNotes – The New Digital Age – Introduction

Earlier this week, a copy of Dr. Eric Shmidt’s and Jared Cohen’s book, The New Digital Age: Transforming nations, businesses and our lives arrived on my desk. It’s been awhile since I have reviewed a book–I’ve been busy catching up on my fiction reading–so I had to remind myself that it’s really about getting acquainted with the ideas.

In this blog entry, I explore the Introduction, then share my reflections. I will repeat the process over the next few days. I encourage you to explore the ideas in The New Digital Age: Transforming nations, businesses and our lives. Read my notes on this book.

Table of Contents

Over the next few days, I’ll be reading the book and sharing my notes on what jumps out at me and my quick reflections.

MyNotes: Introduction

  1. The Internet is…a technology revolution…“that will make it possible for almost everybody to own, develop and disseminate real-time content without having to rely on intermediaries.”
    Reflection: The idea of disintermediation isn’t necessarily new, but how people and businesses are being disintermediated…well, that is changing every day as the technology applications expand and ingenious approaches change how we interact with it. I’m continually amazed at some new technology that’s killed some way of doing things. Books, newspapers, those were the obvious casualties. We’ve seen entire jobs, and I’m reminded of Thomas Friedman’s assertions.
  2. “By 2025, the majority of the world’s population will, in one generation, have gone from having virtually no access to unfiltered information to accessing all of the world’s information through a device that fits in the palm of the hand…we’ll be more efficient, more productive and more creative.”
    Response: This is almost getting cliche, isn’t it? This idea that human beings have access to massive amounts of data. Sure, we’re more informed, but what are we actually changing? Instead of changing the world, we’re trying to figure out if the actor in that movie is the same one we saw on that television show. How are we getting at the fundamental application of information to bring about positive changes in our daily lives? And, when you consider politics, climate change, it’s frightening to imagine that data, facts, and information are now all up for debate and considered opinion. I grew up with fact or opinion. Now, facts, ever-abundant, are up for discussion. I’m not convinced. I suspect that many human beings will choose to be more efficient in their adoption of ignorance, more productive in sharing misinformation and more creative at sharing untruths. If you doubt that, one has only to look at particular media outlets.
  3. “Digital empowerment will be, for some, the first experience of empowerment in their lives, enabling them to be heard, counted and taken seriously…authoritarian governments will find their newly connected populations more difficult to control, repress and influence, while democratic states will be forced to include many more voices in their affairs.”
    Response: Certainly, this is an accurate observation. But after Edward Snowden, it’s clear that democratic governments will find their newly connected populations the same as authoritarian governments found them.
  4. “And because what we post, e-mail, text and share online shapes the virtual identities of others, new forms of collective responsibility will have to come into effect.”
    Response: On the way somewhere earlier today, I heard National Public Radio (NPR) sharing a story on how schools are finding it important to protect the “big data” repositories that have been built by States at the behest of the Federal Government. What ARE our responsibilities in protecting student data?
  5. “In the forthcoming pages, we explore the future as we envision it, full of complex global issues involving citizenship, statecraft, privacy and war, among other issues, with botht he challenges and the solutions driven by the rise of global connectivity…this is a book about the importance of a guiding human hand in the new digital age.”
    Response: Given the power that digital platforms–Google, Facebook, two examples given in the book–have, it’s nice to imagine that the guiding human hand will be that of people like you and me. The nightmare would be if it were human hands whose focus was on greed, and all the worst of humanity can offer.
As I look forward to Chapter 1, I’m curious to see how the authors will address the challenges. Get your copy online at The New Digital Age: Transforming nations, businesses and our lives.

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Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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Value for Tomorrow’s Learners

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Earlier today, I received the following email regarding a book review--Achieving Transformational Leadership–I’d written about Stephanie Sandifer’s book, Wikis for School Leaders.

Folks often ask me, what are the benefits of writing and sharing online via a blog? Well, to be honest, getting exposure to fresh ideas, and getting emails like this one that let you know that yesterday’s learning continues to provide value for tomorrow’s learners.



Dear Miguel My name is Fiona de Villiers and I am the editor of Independent Education, the official quarterly magazine of the Independent Schools’ Association of Southern Africa (ISASA), and the leading South African Education magazine. I invite you to view the online version of our latest issues: http://www.isasa.org/books/Autumn2013/http://www.isasa.org/books/Summer2012/http://www.isasa.org/books/Spring2012/ You can also learn more about us at: www.ieducation.co.za andwww.isasa.org. This year one of our aims for our very popular magazine is to question the role of technology in the classroom and I thought your review entitledAchieving Transformational Leadership – Wikis for School Leaders would provide fascinating perspectives on the issue for our readership, which extends across the entire education sector in southern Africa and beyond.
 I would therefore like to ask for your permission to reprint the piece in our forthcoming issue. We will happily include all requested acknowledgements. Please could you let me know as soon as possible?Kind regards 




Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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