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Apparently, the answer is Yes, that’s exactly what Amazon.com is doing. Lots of issues elaborated on in this Anderson-Cooper YouTube video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKmyHvdKsY4) so be sure to check out the video. This came to my attention via Plurk.

While Amazon.com has clearly crossed the line in terms of providing pedophile related content, a few questions come up:

  1. Should Amazon.com be policing it’s own inventory  (e.g. Apple App store for iPod/iPad type involvement) or serving as a passthrough for content (e.g. club membership that anyone can access content)?
  2. Should Amazon.com be held liable for inappropriate or illegal content? If so, which country decides what’s appropriate and/or legal? What’s illegal in one country might be perfectly OK elsewhere.
  3. Where does the First Amendment (U.S. Constitution) factor in?
What do I think? It’s simple–pedophile stuff should be kicked off the site and Amazon.com should pay a fine for not only providing the content online for sale–and presumably making money off of it–but also for building a community around this Amazon-hosted content.
And, shouldn’t this be a digital citizenship issue for corporations like Amazon?

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Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure